16 1 / 2012

Artist of the Week: Hikari Shimoda

I much prefer her earlier work (circa 2007) to the newer stuff. There’s something a bit disturbing about the solitary children with vacant eyes and withered hands. I particularly love the more detailed floral back drops on the first two images but unfortunately I don’t think that’s her preferred style.

03 1 / 2012

Some more pattern stuff for the amazing Rowan Newton.

Some more pattern stuff for the amazing Rowan Newton.

(Source: rowannewton)

14 12 / 2011

Artist of the Week: Maurizio Anzeri

This guy is one of my favourite artists ever! I almost forgot just how amazing he was until I came across some of his newest work on the net. For those that don’t know he embroiders photographs with wig hair (by hand) to distort the subjects’ faces, LoVe!

22 7 / 2011

R.I.P.

21 7 / 2011

Artist of the Week: Kris Trappeniers

If there’s one thing I can’t do it’s paper cuts; I’ve just never had the patience for it. These portraits were not laser but hand cut! I have no idea how you would even begin to conceive something this detailed as a paper cut but there you go! the results are amazing to say the least.

03 7 / 2011

I love discovering new illustrators, this week I’m all about Claire Scully. These are some of my favourite pieces but there’s a whole lot more amazing work on her website.

15 6 / 2011

The BP Portrait Prize 2011 opens tomorrow at the National Portrait Gallery. They’re using this image; ‘Little Sister’ by Tim Okamura, for all the promotion and marketing of the exhibition. First time I saw it at Bond St. station I stared at it for so long I missed my train without even realising, that hasn’t happened in a while…

The BP Portrait Prize 2011 opens tomorrow at the National Portrait Gallery. They’re using this image; ‘Little Sister’ by Tim Okamura, for all the promotion and marketing of the exhibition. First time I saw it at Bond St. station I stared at it for so long I missed my train without even realising, that hasn’t happened in a while…

24 5 / 2011

Pretty Junk

I stumbled across these crazy assemblages by American artist Zac Freeman which are made entirely out of junk and found objects. What makes his work stand out from others of this nature is that rather than copying a pixelated photograph he arranges the objects in a way that creates an almost painterly effect. Squint your eyes and you’ll know what I mean! Check out more work here.

18 5 / 2011

The Person In The Moment
I’ve always loved portrait photography, even when I had a phobia of drawing people (yes there was such a time). I feel that my own work relates more closely to portrait photography than painting because it is all about capturing a person’s essence in that given moment. All the vulnerabilities and imperfections that a paintbrush has the power to erase have been burnt onto a roll of film. Often the most honest and candid portraits are the photos that are taken in the seconds between poses when the subject is caught off guard. As the observer I find these shots far more compelling as they capture subtle emotions and often I find myself imagining a whole narrative around the given photograph.
Historically portrait painting is about trying to represent the subject as a whole. The artist will spend hours in a sitting trying to squeeze as much of that person onto a canvas as possible. More often than not paintings are completed under instruction of the subject, hence we are seeing what they want us to see and not what they truly are.
So here’s to being caught in the moment, and for a fraction of a second letting the world see us for who we really are.
Photograph courtesy of www.benwatts.com

The Person In The Moment

I’ve always loved portrait photography, even when I had a phobia of drawing people (yes there was such a time). I feel that my own work relates more closely to portrait photography than painting because it is all about capturing a person’s essence in that given moment. All the vulnerabilities and imperfections that a paintbrush has the power to erase have been burnt onto a roll of film. Often the most honest and candid portraits are the photos that are taken in the seconds between poses when the subject is caught off guard. As the observer I find these shots far more compelling as they capture subtle emotions and often I find myself imagining a whole narrative around the given photograph.

Historically portrait painting is about trying to represent the subject as a whole. The artist will spend hours in a sitting trying to squeeze as much of that person onto a canvas as possible. More often than not paintings are completed under instruction of the subject, hence we are seeing what they want us to see and not what they truly are.

So here’s to being caught in the moment, and for a fraction of a second letting the world see us for who we really are.

Photograph courtesy of www.benwatts.com